BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head

Brain Exhibit

Real Human Brain
Families and others visiting the nation’s capital this summer can see a real human brain and are encouraged to touch, explore and learn about the body’s central processing unit in “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head.” Made possible by Pfizer Inc,the exhibit premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C..

Synapse Pop
Visitors learn how a synapse makes the connection between neurons, the brain’s electrical relay system, at “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head.” Made possible by Pfizer Inc,the exhibit premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Release a signal ball down an axon tunnel setting off a light show that imitates the action of an electrical signal traveling between neurons.

Back and Forth
Visitors to “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head” can try to balance on a specially designed platform to see how the brain controls reflexes, autonomic functions and balance. Back and Forth is just one of the many interactive displays at the exhibit, made possible by Pfizer Inc and designed to bring the mysteries of the brain to light. The exhibit premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Wired
The brain develops in stages as we age. Visitors can trace the development of this essential organ from the womb to adolescence and beyond in “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head,” premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Two Girls Exam the Inner Brain
Visitors get a hands-on look at the physical aspects of the body’s central command through the “Unhinge-A-Brain” interactive display in a new national traveling exhibit, “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head.” It premiered at the Smithsonian Institution Arts and Industries Building in Washington, D.C.

Phineas Gage
Man’s knowledge of the brain is relatively new. See the history of amazing clues and myths about its function at “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head,” premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Displays such as a re-creation of the skull of Phineas Gage, a man whose brain was pierced by a metal rod, trace the evolution of scientists’ understanding of the brain’s physiology.

EEG
Interactive stations at “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head” teach visitors about brain mechanics and function, illusion, sleep, health and evolution. Children and grownups can lean on electrodes to see a simulation of real-time EEG measurements of corresponding brain activity. The exhibit, made possible by Pfizer Inc,premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Boost Your Brain
“BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head,” premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., encourages brain health. In Boost Your Brain, visitors may spin the wheel to score points for activities that promote brain health – nutrition, exercise, etc. Points are lost for destructive behaviors.

Brain Surgery Simulation with Gamma Knife
“BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head” teaches visitors how the brain controls the mind and body, and how it may be affected by diseases and disorders. A gamma knife simulator allows visitors to try their hand at excising a brain tumor. The exhibit, made possible by Pfizer Inc,premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Mystery of the Mind
The mind involves perception, learning and memory, consciousness and self-awareness. It also involves dreams. “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head,” premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., shares what has been learned about the mysterious inner workings of the mind.

Distortion Computer Interactive
Learn how the mind plays tricks on people at “BRAIN: The World Inside Your Head,” premiered at the Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Follow the instructions on several computer illusions to help scientists understand how the brain’s biases affect our view of the world.